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فهرست مقالات

Observational Learning: A Suitable Alternative to Physical Practice

نویسنده:

(4 صفحه - از 241 تا 244)

خلاصه ماشینی:

"2. Assistant Professor, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamadan, Iran INTRODUCTION There is no doubt that physical practice leads to learning a motor task. Various studies, on the other hand, have shown that another effective way for motor learning is observing a model performing the same task, known as "observational learning" (1-5). For example, Rohbanfard and Proteau (2011) indicated that observing a novice model, an expert model, or a combination of both novice and expert models leads to better learning of a relative timing task (2). The aim of the present study, therefore, was to determine whether observation of a model by itself results in same learning as compared with physical practice. com strategy, then, it is hypothesized that observation or physical practice leads to same results while learning short backhand serve in Badminton."

صفحه: از 241 تا 244
241 Annals of Applied Sport Science , Spring 2015, Volume 3 - Number 9

‌ ‌‌‌ANNALS‌ OF APPLIED SPORT SCIENCE–Special Issue

First National Congress of

"New Scientific Consequence‌ for‌ Iran‌’s Sport Development" Lahijan Branch, Islamic Azad University, 2014, 10-11 December

w w w . aas s j our nal. c om‌

ISSN (Online): 2322 – 4479

Observational Learning: A Suitable Alternative

to Physical Practice

1Mahsa Ajam‌, 2Hassan Rohbanfard∗

1 M.A. in Physical‌ Education‌ and Sport Sciences, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamedan, Iran.

2. Assistant Professor, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamadan, Iran

INTRODUCTION

There is no doubt that physical practice leads to learning a motor task. However‌, this type of practice is not always possible, or in some cases may not be the best strategy (e.g., injury, etc.). Moreover, in some cases it needs enough time and facilities. Various‌ studies‌, on the other hand, have shown that another effective way for motor learning is observing a model performing the same task, known as "observational learning" (1-5). It is believed that observation enables‌ an‌ individual to determine the key spatial and/or temporal features of the task, which removes the need to create a cognitive representation of the action pattern through trial and error‌ (i.e., physical‌ practice; 1). For example, Rohbanfard and Proteau (2011) indicated that observing a novice model, an expert model, or a combination of both novice and expert models leads to better learning of a relative‌ timing‌ task‌ (2). However, research investigating the effectiveness‌ of‌ each‌ training method (physical practice vs. observation) was not found. The aim of the present study, therefore, was to determine whether observation‌ of‌ a model‌ by itself results in same learning as compared‌ with‌ physical practice. Neurological research has illustrated that the same areas of the brain are activated during the execution of‌ a task‌ as‌ well as during the observation of a model performing the task‌. Despite the belief that physically practicing a motor skill is the best learning

Corresponding Author:

Hassan Rohbanfard

E-mail: hrahbanfard‌@yahoo‌.com‌

242 Annals of Applied Sport Science , Spring 2015, Volume 3 - Number 9

243 Annals of Applied Sport Science , Spring 2015, Volume 3 - Number 9

244 Annals of Applied Sport Science , Spring 2015, Volume 3 - Number 9